Thursday, May 10, 2012

Kindergarten Ooos and Ahhs

During every kindergarten class today we heard repeated choruses of "Ooooo" and "Ahhhh" as students dropped primary colored liquid watercolors on wet board and watched it move together creating new colors. We started the lesson with a quick talk about primary colors and a really short video ( a minute and a half) from Sesame Street on Primary Colors. My inspiration for this lesson was a first grade project I saw on Pinterest here that focused on Mondrian. I changed the focus but went for a similar grid pattern.
They were using a board that was divided into 6 areas with masking tape. Each section was a little mini-painting. (Next week we peel off the tape to reveal the white lines of the board.) Kids also had the option of sprinkling salt on their wet paint -- that brought a whole new series of "Oh, Look!!" comments!!


My plan for next week is for the kids to brush off the remaining salt crystals, peel off the tape and arrange the pieces so that the lines meet up and create a cooperative large work. I'll be sure to take pictures to post:)

If I were doing this with older kids I would have them also outline the white lines with a fine black marker, like this:
A large focus of this lesson was use of the brush: how to clean it between colors, how not to smash its hair, how to dry it using a sponge, etc. Even so, these are kindergarteners and that yellow paint didn't stay yellow at all the tables. SO, WORD OF WARNING: if you try this, be sure to have some extra little containers of yellow that you can use to replace the dirty ones!!!!
This table did a great job of cleaning their brushes and keeping their yellow clean!!
After cleaning up, the kids came to the rug for a reading of Mouse Paint to again reinforce mixing primary colors. What a fun day it was!!

28 comments:

  1. Christie these are amazing! I struggle with kinders and I think I could really do this! The colors are so vivid-like a rainbow! Thanks for such a great post.

    :)Pat

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kinders are a challenge for me too, Pat. The biggest challenge with this lesson was actually changing the kids' water to keep it relatively clean. 2 of my classes had parent volunteers or instructional aides come with them and that was a BIG help!! I did have one tub of water for brush cleaning for every two kids. Then I had another container of clean water on each table for them to use to brush water on their space before adding the paint. That step was the hardest for them to remember -- that they needed to start with water to get the paint to run. Good luck with it:))

      Delete
    2. thanks for this one! How about letting the kids do a (straight line) design with the masking tape first? Perhaps they could even bend the masking tape - as long as they press down the creases in it. (I'm planning to try this lesson tomorrow)

      Delete
    3. It went quite well - I let them do any shape they wanted with the pieces of tape I gave them - after a demo by me of how to do it at the start. Just let the runny paint mix together however you like, I told them (I'm all for opportunities for experimentation and originality wherever possible).
      We just used regular paper, not board. Didn't try salt yet. I could post some pics after they peel of the masking tape next week.

      Delete
    4. Glad to hear that it all worked out well!!!

      Delete
    5. Any tips on making sure the masking tape doesn't pull up the paper when you remove it? I just did a trial and it ripped it up. Thanks

      Delete
    6. If you pull the tape off the paper flat against the paper (horizontally) instead of straight up in the air, which is more instinctual, the paper won't rip. Ok, it might a little bit, but not much :0 Also, try experimenting with different tapes, in particular blue tape for painting trim.

      Delete
    7. I really like that blue painter tape!

      Delete
  2. Fantastic colorful results.
    How great masking tape kept the liquid colors for getting under.
    I love the idea of using salt for a different effect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We'll see tomorrow just how well that masking tape worked!!

      Delete
    2. try using painters tape less chance of ripping the painting

      Delete
  3. These are so fresh and contemporary- LOVE them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I am anxious to see them all displayed together!!

      Delete
  4. Please visit my blog to receive your Original Blog award.
    Congratulations

    ReplyDelete
  5. WOW! How I love these! Pinning!!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hey!! I love your blog and I LOve this project! I will definitely be doing it with my kinders...maybe even this week.

    I was hoping to be included in your links along the side of your blog. If you are interested, we can do a link swap! Please let me know!

    ReplyDelete
  7. What type of board did you use?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had a large variety of illustration board scraps from a framing store. There were probably 6 or 7 different brands. They were all cut as rectangles, but I didn't worry about uniform dimensions. The liquid watercolor "took" on all of the varieties. I used regular masking tape (not the blue painters' tape) to minimize leakage under the tape. However, because of that I cautioned the kids to tear carefully for the first little bit (1/2 inch or so) and then to rip away quickly. Out of 5 classes (27 or so in each class) I only had 2 kids that ripped a bit too vigorously and the board tore. BUT -- that was easily fixed -- I had my trusty glue bottle in hand and slapped it back together before the kids even realized what happened!!!

      Delete
  8. Has anybody else tried this using illustration board because my paint just sits on top of the board and the colors do not spread out or anything. In your directions you say a wet board so what I tried was just dipping my paint brush in water and going over just a single area with water and then applying my primary colors to it. My colors just kind of float on top like there was too much water but I used very little. The colors did spread out but it didn't soak into the board is it suppose to? Plus your colors look so vivid and ours didn't come out like that. I know the salt really brings out the colors which was cool to see. Any help would be greatly appreciated since I'm trying this project for school tomorrow :)

    Thanks

    -christina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It has been awhile since we did this, but I think I had kids brush on water one section at a time also. As I mentioned, we had a variety of brands of board and the liquid water color worked on each board. I am pretty sure we were using Sax Liquid water colors (red, yellow and blue). I don't recall that the paint soaked into the board immediately, and it is important for the kids to sprinkle the salt when the watercolors are quite wet. I also don't recall how much I diluted the liquid watercolors -- probably not a lot for this kind of project. Hope it works for you!!

      Delete
  9. Did you just call the framing store and ask for leftover board? Would I have luck calling Michaels, do you think?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I walked into one of our local framing stores and just asked. They had me talk to the manager, I explained that I was doing this art program at a local school and she agreed immediately. I thought I would get small scraps to do some collage things with. But, to my amazement, their idea of scraps and mine were VERY different. They frame a lot of large pieces and don't re-use the middle pieces that they cut out from the mattes, so I get all of that. It really is a testament to "what is one person's trash is another's treasure"!!! I will say, that I asked at a larger nationally known framing store and they were less forthcoming. They told me they couldn't do it because they use their scraps. So, I would say, if you try one place and they say "No" don't give up, try other stores, too. I've learned throughout the years that it never hurts to ask - your cause is a good one!! I do think you might have better luck going in and talking to someone in person. That way they can see how sincere you are about wanting to provide a good art experience for your students. Good luck!!!

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Kids painted each section of their board with clear water (making it wet) before dropping the liquid watercolor onto it. When wet hits wet, the color spreads on its own.

      Delete
  11. Another successful lesson via your inspiration. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete