Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Math Doubles to Art Doubles

A little while ago 2nd graders were working on learning their doubles math facts (i.e. 4  + 4 = 8, 6 + 6 = 12. etc.) so we decided to make a mini art project to reinforce the facts that they found the hardest for them to remember. We started with building several equations using Unifix Cubes and Pattern Blocks.



Then I read them the book, Two of Everything, to really cement the idea of doubling a number.



In this book there is a magic pot that doubles anything that falls into it. So this was an opportunity to teach kids how to use oil pastels to make a 3-D looking pot using shading techniques. See here for more directions.





Next, students made two sets of matching objects or people to represent their doubles equation. For people they used paint to print the faces and then crayons and Sharpies for the rest of their drawing.





I had them write the addition equation on a red strip and the matching multiplication equation on green ( just to link the concepts).

Here are a few of the finished projects:





Sunday, February 12, 2017

Presidents' Day Art & Math with Quarters

Here's a fun way to learn about quarters for both math and art. 



I actually started thinking about this awhile ago when I drove by this wall art in the neighborhood.



The lesson starts out with the kids creating the background so that it can dry by the time they are ready to glue on their coin rubbings. This background is wet on wet watercolor.



Then students get to the real work. Using my favorite PRANG colored pencils, they rub the heads side and the tail side of various quarters, noticing all the details. Working in small groups, and using small magnifying glasses, each group records everything they see on their coins on a record sheet.





Later we record their observations in chart form and discuss them. We actually do this for all coins at another time and have the charts to compare what kids find on them all.



Quarters are such great coins to study since they have started being minted for each state. Depending on the age and skills of your students you can decide how much research to have them do as they discover phrases on some of the state quarters. For example, the Hawaii 2008 coin has Hawaiian words that kids can look up on the computer to find the translation. For those of you who are curious, the Hawaiian translation is "The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness." Nice, huh??!!



You can also decide whether to have kids label their rubbings and how detailed to be. Another option is to have students color in each state on a U.S. map to match the color of their rubbing:



I am getting ready to this with 2nd graders and will share some of their art results as they are available. I should mention that I also plan to extend this lesson in math to augment place value/tens and ones work that these students are doing.

Happy Presidents' Day -- hope you enjoy celebrating on your 3 day weekend, too!!!

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Pastel Snow People Mural

Here in California we are having our version of a cold weather winter (rainy and in the 50°s). So it seemed a good time to work with 2nd graders on shading spheres to make snowmen!!


You can see how students used pastels to shade the spheres of the their snow people.


After cutting out their people, kids colored and cut out details ( hats, arms, scarves, etc) to glue onto them.


Some students made larger snowmen/women and others made smaller ones. As they went out in the hallway to add their people to the mural, the smaller people were placed to appear further back, giving the landscape the appearance of distance.

The last step was to add snow, which they did by stamping small circles using the handle of a paintbrush and white tempera paint. Of course, we did this on our coldest day of year so far!!
This lesson, like the last one I posted, was based on the book, Snowmen at Night.



As an aside, when I left school after finishing up the mural I went for a quick walk between the thunder showers to share with you. We had a bit of wind the night before, thus the fallen palm fronds.